Mars Ice Challenge Steering Committee

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Ben Galke

Benjamin Galke

NASA Langley Research Center


Benjamin Galke graduated from the University of Missouri-Rolla in 2002 with a bachelor of science in Electrical Engineering. Since this time, Ben has worked primarily as a controls engineer specializing in process control and automation in the consumer products manufacturing and food and beverage industries, as a NASA contractor, and now as a NASA Civil Servant. Ben is currently a Project Manager for NASA LaRC Center Operations Directorate managing large ground systems projects in various wind tunnels, ground test facilities, and the LaRC high pressure air generating facility. Ben has experience designing, constructing, operating, upgrading, and maintaining industrial systems in private and public industries, ground test facilities automation at NASA, ground prototype design and development, software development, systems design, and project management.

Benjamin Galke

NASA Langley Research Center

Steven Hoffman

Dr. Steven Hoffman

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)


Dr. Stephen Hoffman is a Senior Systems Engineer with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). He has 38 years of experience working in civilian space programs performing tasks involving program management, interplanetary mission planning, preliminary spacecraft design, orbit mechanics, and planetary analog missions. Dr. Hoffman is currently supporting the Exploration Mission Planning Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center. He supports a variety of mission studies and concept assessments associated with human exploration beyond low Earth orbit for this office.

During his career Dr. Hoffman has participated in the design and implementation of field tests of candidate systems and operations for future human exploration of the Moon and Mars. He has carried out these tests in a variety of analog environments, including: five personal deployments and support for four other deployments to locations in the Arctic (Devon Island, Elsmere Island, and Greenland); three deployments with NASA’s Desert RATS program in the U.S. desert southwest (Silver Lake, CA and Meteor Crater, AZ); part of the team that initiated and facilitated the NASA-NSF-ILC/Dover year-long field test of an inflatable habitat in the Antarctic (McMurdo Station). He is currently the lead for an international group, the Analogue Action Team (AAT), which supports the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG). In this position he has lead the development of the analogues portion of ISECG’s Global Exploration Roadmap (GER).

Stephen Hoffman received a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from the University of Illinois in 1978 (summa cum laude), 1980, and 1984, respectively. He has published over 70 conference papers, journal articles, and technical reports in the areas of solid propellant hazards, future space mission planning, aero-assisted orbit mechanics, and on-orbit satellite servicing.

Stephen Hoffman

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)

SharonJefferies

Sharon Jefferies

NASA Johnson Space Center


Sharon Jefferies is an aerospace engineer in the Space Mission Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center. She currently leads architecture integration for the NASA Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) as well as leading the effort to assess incorporation of reusable in-space transportation systems into the EMC. She graduated in 1995 from the U.S. Military Academy with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. After serving in the Army, she joined NASA in 2006 where she has supported mission and systems concept development and analysis for lunar, NEA, and Mars mission studies under the Human spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) and for NASA’s Asteroid Redirect Mission. She served as integration lead for crew mobility and robotic systems, providing systems concept development, mission concept-of-operations development, and capability needs assessment for these systems in human exploration architectures. She supported the development of NASA’s Small Pressurized Rover prototype vehicle, including mission analog testing through NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies. She has also worked as a senior technologist in NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist, where she supported the development of NASA’s Technology Roadmaps and strategic planning for NASA technology investments to support human exploration and science mission needs.

Sharon Jefferies

NASA Langley Research Center

ChristopherJones

Christopher Jones

NASA Langley Research Center


Dr. Christopher Jones works in the Space Mission Analysis Branch at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. His current work includes strategic analysis of space technology investments, applications of in-space assembly to Mars exploration, and mission design for an Earth Science satellite. His previous work includes leading development of a Venus atmospheric exploration concept, performing trajectory analysis in support of future NASA missions, and modeling in-situ resource utilization architectures for the Moon and Mars. He obtained his Masters and Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from Georgia Tech in 2009 and 2016, respectively, and his Bachelors in mechanical engineering from the University of South Carolina in 2007.

Christopher Jones

NASA Langley Research Center

Robert Moses

Robert Moses

NASA Langley Research Center


Robert Moses joined NASA in 1989 and immediately contributed to flight test teams developing hardware for shuttle missions. In 1991, participated in the launch of his first hardware mission onboard Atlantis, STS-37. Following this successful launch, entered a NASA-sponsored graduate program until 1997. Up to 2003, participated in a multi-national aeronautics program to solve and control unsteady aerodynamics on twin-tail fighters, resulting in the redesign of the F-22 and the Joint Strike Fighter. Also, during this timeframe, he created a new entry descent and landing technology called Regenerative Aerobraking to recapture some of the energy lost during aerobraking at Mars. In 2004, he joined the Exploration Engineering Branch at LaRC and won several Agency-level bid proposal opportunities under the Exploration Mission Directorate for “In-Space Assembly of Modular Structures” and “Inflatable Decelerators for Return from the Moon”. Shortly thereafter, the Constellation Program was born where he joined the Constellation Program Flight Test Office based at Johnson Space Center to co-lead the development of the Integrated Flight Test Strategy that created the flight demonstration manifest aimed at retiring risk prior to docking a human-rated Orion with the ISS. After Constellation, Robert remained in the Exploration Engineering Branch that became the Atmospheric Flight and Entry Systems Branch where he mentors students among several internship programs and leads technology development for crewed missions to Mars. During the past four years, Robert worked on an advanced technology project to explore a new energy theory, and to develop radiation protection devices for the in-space habitat under the Radworks Program led by Johnson Space Center. In 2014, Robert joined a small Blue Sky study team to derive a strategy for using In-Situ Resource Utilization to enable crewed missions to Mars by the 2030s.

Robert Moses

NASA Langley Research Center

LaNetraTate

Dr. Anthony Calomino

NASA Langley Research Center


Dr. Anthony Calomino is a materials and structures research engineer with the NASA Langley Research Center and has worked for NASA since 1985. He has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in Structural and Engineering Mechanics, and obtained a doctorate in Materials Science from Northwestern University. His primary research is in durability and damage modeling for high temperature materials and composites including metallic super alloys, ceramic matrix composites, ablators, and refractory soft goods. Dr. Calomino currently serves as the NASA Materials technical lead for Entry Systems Modeling project and the Deputy Principal Investigator for Flexible Systems Development under NASA’s Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project.

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Anthony Calomino

NASA Langley Research Center

 
PatTroutman

Patrick A. Troutman

NASA Langley Research Center


Patrick A. Troutman graduated in 1984 from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University with a BS in Aerospace & Oceanographic Engineering along with a minor in Computer Science. Since this time he has worked for NASA LaRC as a contractor and a civil servant developing and utilizing analyses capabilities in support of space system studies, leading several space station redesign and risk mitigation studies, and leading systems analysis related to future space scenarios including managing the NASA Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) program. Mr. Troutman currently serves as the lead for human exploration architecture integration for the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) and as the human exploration strategic analysis lead at Langley. He resides in Williamsburg, Virginia with his wife Jean and daughters Leanne & Robyn.

Patrick A. Troutman

NASA Langley Research Center

KrisZacny

Dr. Kris Zacny

Honeybee Robotics


Dr. Kris Zacny's expertise includes terrestrial and extraterrestrial robotic drilling, excavation, ISRU, sample handling and processing, geotechnical systems, and sensors. Currently he leads the Exploration Technology Group at Honeybee Robotics focusing on developing robotic systems for unstructured and extreme environments on and off Earth.

In his previous capacity as an engineer in the South African mining industry, Dr. Zacny managed numerous mining projects and production divisions. Dr. Zacny received his PhD (UC Berkeley, 2005) in Geotechnical Engineering with an emphasis on Mars drilling, ME (UC Berkeley, 2001) in Petroleum Engineering, and BSc cum laude (U. Cape Town, 1997) in Mechanical Engineering.

He has participated in several Arctic, Antarctic, Atacama, and Greenland expeditions. Dr. Zacny has over 150 publications, over 40 NASA New Technology Records, and four NASA Group Achievement Awards.

Kris Zacny

Honeybee Robotics